2019 Gulf Coast Parade Schedule - Mardi Gras Beads, King Cakes, and Parades Ohh My! Experience Carnival Season a Gulf Coast Tradition JAN 29, 2019 Tricia McAlvain

Anticipation of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Mardi Gras traditions run high with thoughts of bright colored beads, scrumptious king cakes, and magnificent costumes and themed parades dancing in One's mind. Each year Carnival season purples, golds and greens follow right behind the colors of Christmas with elegance as the annual Mardi Gras parade season begins to roll through the streets of the Gulf Coast.

 

Mardi Gras parades are well organized by a membership of like-minded people referred to as a Krewe. A person must be invited to join a Krewe, with the acceptance of their application being placed before a membership review board. Many Krewes are made of long lines of proud Gulf Coast families creating annual coastal family traditions. Mardi Gras Krewes bring families, friends, and colleagues together in the spirit of Carnival season.

 

History tells us during French rule, the first ever Mardi Gras parade was held in Mobile, Alabama in the early 1700s.  Pre-Katrina New Orleans would see 60 or more parades rolling through their streets. As time progresses our economy changes and so do our Mardi Gras parades. Dancing clubs and walking troupes are popping up in every coastal city adding a new array of traditions and an eclectic element with their music, dance, and visual performance art. Mississippians truly embrace the Mardi Gras traditions of their own with long running annual Mardi Gras parades in each Gulf Coast city.

 

Each Krewe hold true to their own unique traditions while keeping the common thread of crowning a new King or Queen each year. These individuals are picked from the respective Krewe membership. Floats are designed around the Krewes particular theme for the year and often reflect current topics and cultural events. Members of each Krewe have the honor of riding the floats and they will toss beads and trinkets to the crowd over the course of the Mardi Gras parade route. The trinkets usually bear the Krewes emblem along with the theme and date. 

 

2019 Gulf Coast Mardi Gras Parade Schedule


Saturday, February 9

Krewe of the Pearl Mardi Gras Parade

Goodyear Blvd, Main St, W Canal St, Kirkwood St, Goodyear Blvd

Picayune, 2pm


Saturday, February 16 

Annual Ocean Springs Elks Mardi Gras Parade 

Front Beach, Porter Ave, Washington Ave, Government St, and Holcomb Blvd

Ocean Springs, 1pm facebook.com/events/256716421523725 


Annual Krewe of Legacy Mardi Gras Parade 

JP Ladner Rd, Edwin Ladner Rd, Vidalia Rd

Pass Christian, 1pm facebook.com/123LEGACY 


Annual Pass Christian Carnival Association Mardi Gras Parade

JP Ladner Rd, Edwin Ladner Rd, Vidalia Rd

Pass Christian, 1pm


Second Liners Mardi Gras Club Parade

Nichols Dr, Division St, Caillavet St to Esters Blvd (end at Doris C Busch Park)

Biloxi, 1pm 


Annual Krewe Unique Mardi Gras Parade

Front Beach, Porter Ave, Washington Ave, Government St, and Holcomb Blvd

Ocean Springs, 2pm 


Sunday, February 17 

Annual Lizana Mardi Gras Parade 

Lizana School Rd, Cable Bridge Rd, Northrop Cuevas Rd, back to Lizana School Rd

Gulfport, 1pm 


Saturday, February 23 

Annual Biloxi Children’s Mardi Gras Walking Parade 

Downtown Biloxi, Rue Magnolia District

Biloxi, 10a, biloxi.ms.us


Annual Krewe of Little Rascals Children Mardi Gras Parade 

Delmas Ave, Canty St, Watts Ave, and Magnolia St 

Pascagoula, 1pm, mainstreetpascagoula.com 


Annual Mystic Krewe of Pine Island Mardi Gras Parade 

John's Bayou Rd

Vancleave, 1:30pm 


Annual Carnival Association of Long Beach Mardi Gras Parade

Cleveland Ave, 1st St, Jeff Davis, E Railroad, Cleveland Ave

Long Beach, 6pm longbeachcarnival.com 


Annual Gautier Men's Club Mardi Gras Parade 

Dolphin Rd, Gautier-Vancleave Rd, Highway 90, Dolphin Dr 

Gautier, 7pm gautiernightparade.com 


Sunday, February 24 

Annual Krewe of Nereids Mardi Gras Parade 

Begins at Auderer Blvd & Hwy 90 to Drinkwater Rd

Waveland, 12pm thekreweofnereids.com 


Krewe of Barkloxi-Annual Bow Wow PAW-RADE 

Spectators free, $10 pre-registration fee per pet, $15 registration day of event.

Biloxi Town Green, 710 Beach Blvd 

Biloxi, 1pm facebook.com/MyHSSM 


Friday, March 1 

Ocean Springs Carnival Association Night Mardi Gras Parade

Front Beach, Porter Ave, Washington Ave, Government St, Holcomb Blvd

Ocean Springs, 7pm osnightparade.com 


Saturday, March 2 

Annual Krewe of Diamondhead Mardi Gras Parade 

Gex Dr, Kalani Dr, Diamondhead Dr, Golf Club Dr 

Diamondhead, 12pm


Annual Jackson County Carnival Association Mardi Gras Parade 

Ingalls Ave, Market St, Jackson Ave, Pascagoula St

Pascagoula, 1pm 


Annual Krewe of Gemini Mardi Gras Day Parade 

19th St, Hwy 49, 14th St, 13th St, 24th Ave, 14th St, 21st Ave, 14th St, 24th Ave, 19th St 

Gulfport, 2pm 


Annual Krewe of Neptune Night Mardi Gras Parade 

Main St, Hwy 90, Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Howard Ave, Caillavet St

Biloxi, 5:30pm kreweofneptune.org 


Annual Krewe of Salacia Parade 

Main St, Hwy 90, Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Howard Ave, Caillavet St

 Biloxi, 6:30pm facebook.com/KreweofSalacia 


Sunday, March 3 

Annual St. Paul Mardi Gras Parade 

Second St, St Louis St, Henderson Ave, Scenic Drive, Davis Ave

Pass Christian, 12:30am stpaulcarnival.com 


Annual D'Iberville/St Martin North Bay Area Mardi Gras Parade 

Lemoyne Blvd, Central Ave, Rodriguez St, Automall Parkway

D'Iberville , 1:30pm 


Monday, March 4, Lundi Gras

Annual Mystic Krewe of the Seahorse Mardi Gras Parade 

Bookter St, Necaise Ave, Main St, Demontluzin Ave, Bay St Louis, Bookter St

Bay St Louis, 5pm facebook.com/mystickreweoftheseahorse 


Tuesday, March 5, Mardi Gras

Annual Gulf Coast Carnival Association Mardi Gras Parade 

Main St, Hwy 90, Lameuse St, Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Reynoir St, Hwy 90, Porter Ave, Howard Ave

Biloxi, 1pm gulfcoastcarnivalassociation.com 


Annual Krewe of Diamonds Mardi Gras Parade 

Bookter & Necaise Ave, Main St, N Beach Blvd, Union St, Blaize  Ave, Sycamore St, Bookter St

Bay St Louis, 1pm 


Krewe of Real People the Next Generation Mardi Gras Parade

Bookter & Necaise Ave, Main St, N Beach Blvd, Union St, Blaize  Ave, Sycamore St, Bookter St

Bay St Louis, 1pm 


Annual Krewe of Gemini Mardi Gras Night Parade

19th St, Hwy 49, 14th St, 13th St, 24th Ave, 14th St, 21st Ave, 14th St, 24th Ave, 19th St

Gulfport, 5:30pm


 



Recognizing Gulf Coast Outpost Businesses NOV 9, 2018 Connie Raley

The Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage Area (MGCNHA) recently awarded the Gulf Coast Outpost (GCO) recognition to local nature-based business owners and operators. Businesses such as eco tours, locally owned outfitters, charter boat operators, tour guides, eco-lodges and agritourism entities are encouraged to participate. 


The checklist for recognition focuses on training, sustainability and stewardship. Proper maintenance of equipment and vehicles is a must, ensuring safety, low emission and fuel efficiency. Owners and operators must be knowledgeable about the Coast’s natural environment and tell an accurate story of our resources. It is important to bring awareness to all that we offer here in the way of outdoor activities and learning experiences.


The National Heritage Area partners with stakeholders in the industry, including the regional tourism organization, Visit Mississippi Gulf Coast, the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plains, a nonprofit that acquires land to preserve it in perpetuity for conservation, and the USM Marine Education Center. Visit Mississippi Gulf Coast acknowledges that the GCO program gives a layer of security to tourists who can rest assure they will receive an authentic experience that follows mindful practices of conservation and preservation.


This is the first group of nature-based tourism businesses to receive the designation of a Gulf Coast Outpost. Recipients were honored to be recognized. This is a big step for the Mississippi Gulf Coast in promoting protection of resources and values.


Harrison County:


Among other tours, the Betsy Ann Riverboat offers a two-hour historical and ecological cruise between Deer Island and into Biloxi with a focus on our local history, the seafood industry, the Barrier Islands and wildlife that flourish in the Mississippi Sound Estuary. 

Photo provided by Play The Coast
 
 

The Biloxi Shrimping Trip offers tours where visitors are educated on the history and culture of the shrimping and seafood industry of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The captive audience experiences first-hand the marine life, birds and vegetation in and around the Mississippi Sound. 

 
 
 
 

Fisher-man Guide Service out of Pass Christian offers guests nearshore fishing, night floundering trips and sunset cruises. Fisher-man Guide Service has a business plan to reflect environmental management and natural resource stewardship.

 

 

North Star Sailing offers sailing lessons, as well as private sailing and dinner charters. An affiliate of the American Sailing Association, North Star Sailing Charters out of Gulfport and is proud to share the beauty, heritage and ecology of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. 

 
 
Jackson County:

Eco-Tours of South Mississippi offers a variety of tours, including motorboat swamp tours, kayak trips, photography trips and custom tours. The owners work tirelessly to promote our natural resources and to educate their guests about the ecosystems, wildlife, history, heritage and conservation of the Pascagoula River and the Mississippi Sound. 

 

 

Harbor Garden House is an eco-lodge surrounded with native vegetation, wooded walking paths, and excellent bird watching, and is designed to have the least possible impact on the natural environment in which it is situated. 

 

Hancock County:


Shore Thing Fishing Charters, established in 2003, has seven licensed captains that fish in MS and LA. They also offer eco-lodging on Cat Island and birding trips for nature enthusiasts. The captains are involved in conservation activities and are knowledgeable about our history and culture. 

 

 

Rounding out this year’s Gulf Coast Outpost designation recipients is Coastal Ridge Farm, a true gem in the agritourism of South Mississippi. Coastal Ridge Farm is a fresh-cut flower farm in the northern part of Hancock County. They offer u-pick on certain weekends in the spring and fall where locals and visitors spend family time picking their very own big beautiful sunflowers and taking pictures. 


 


These designations were given on a voluntary basis. The MGCNHA encourages all nature-based tourism to consider making strides to incorporate some best practices, conservation and trainings to better help preserve out natural heritage and plentiful resources. Let’s work together with our communities to ensure that locals and visitors are well informed, educated, and connected to a sense of ownership and pride for the efforts here to preserve our Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage. 


Learn more about Gulf Coast Outpost under the Natural tab at msgulfcoastheritage.ms.gov and gulfcoastoutpost.com.

 

Cover photo contributed by Visit Mississippi Gulf Coast 



Saving the Mississippi Sandhill Crane: Rarest Bird in North America NOV 7, 2018 Connie Raley

The 1970’s saw the expansion of the Interstate 10 freeway system across South Mississippi. The promise of greater ease in travel brought with it great controversy. The freeway was being built right through the home of the sandhill crane in Jackson County. Jacob M. (Jake) Valentine, Jr. was assigned to investigate the effects on this population.


Jake realized the severe decline on the crane’s habitat, the wet pine savanna, and called for a refuge. There were only 30-35 of this rare bird left in the wild. The case went all the way to federal court and eventually led to the creation of the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. In 1973, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service added the Mississippi sandhill crane to the endangered species list and Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR was the first refuge established under the Endangered Species Act. 

The wet pine savanna used to cover a stretch from Louisiana to Florida. Now, the savanna ecosystem itself is endangered. The refuge is 19,000 acres in size, having grown since its inception. However, this is less than 5% of the original savanna habitat that covered these lands. In order to manage the existence and increase the population of the cranes, the wildlife rangers must manage the health of the habitat.


Our region receives a large amount of rain each year; combined with the bayous, swamps and ponds, the hydrology table remains high. This is good for the native plant and wildlife here, as well as the migratory bird population. Too much water, however, produces an overgrowth of vegetation. The soil is drained regularly, and prescribed fires are scheduled in two year intervals. 

Prescribed fires are effective in wildlife management to burn off the fuel, unnecessary brush and pine needles, that could lead to a wildfire. Units of land are burned separately, taking into account wind and weather to protect residences and businesses. Prescribed fire simulates natural fire and burns away dense, shrubby vegetation. An open savanna is not only necessary for the herbaceous plants to receive the sun they need, but the dense pine woods are not favorable for the nesting and feeding cranes.


Unlike other familiar large birds in this area, such as the egret and blue heron, the sandhill crane does not have what we would consider to be a thumb talon. Though they are great flyers, they will not nest or perch in the trees. Their three forward-facing talons are good solely for walking. Therefore, you will only see them strutting along the ground. Also unlike the other two great birds, the crane forages for food differently. Their beaks penetrate the ground searching for roots and tubers, grubs and insects. They have a similar appearance to the egret and heron, but you will know them by their brightly colored red head.

Thanks to the landowners in the surrounding area who maintain open fields, farms and ponds, you may spot a crane outside of the refuge; though they will not venture outside of Jackson County and their savanna. 


Today, there are around 130 cranes on the refuge. The question is often asked, why are there not more? The sandhill crane is a species with a low recruitment rate. They do not produce a lot of young, and when their habitat has been upset, they don’t bounce back as quickly. They are slow to reproduce and have trouble with change. However, in 40 years they have tripled their number. 

Each bird is tracked as an individual and monitored by a radio band. The naturalists keep a stud book to trace the lineages of their birds to help maintain diversity. Cranes only produce about two eggs a year. Often, only one of those will make it to adulthood. Conservation efforts are necessary to help increase the chance for greater survival. 


Some eggs will be taken and placed in a closed part of the refuge where surrogate parents will raise them. This is often the "extra,” or second egg. This will occur in areas where there are more predators, such as bobcats or raccoons. Also, in order to maintain diversity in the flock, lineages that are not as well represented will also be given special care.


Whenever there are not enough bird parents, surrogate humans will raise them wearing a crane costume so that the young do not imprint on the humans. Special breeding facilities in New Orleans and Florida will also be utilized. Rearing chicks in captive flocks gives them the competitive edge they need. They will then be transferred back to the refuge for reintroduction. The birds will live in large, open, temporary pens for 30 days to acclimate to the surroundings.

Often other birds will visit the pen and welcome the young to the neighborhood. One such bird is Sir Sticky Buns, named by college interns during their bread-themed naming year. Sticky Buns is a loner, a male, who likes to greet the new recruits. He hasn’t taken a mate, but seems to enjoy his role as commander. 


Cranes are territorial and creatures of habit. They tend to hang in the same areas with the same birds, much like clicks in school. They spend a year with their parents, which is rare for birds. They also mate for life. However, one female named Aunt Alice is having trouble with the concept. She is in love with a mated fellow, and stays close to him and his female. Maybe she would do better working her magic on Sticky Buns. Only time will tell. 


Though the MS Sandhill Crane NWR is part of the globally important bird area, the refuge is actively managed for the sake of all of its plant and wildlife. Since grasslands around the country are disappearing, one quarter of the population of Henslow Sparrows in the U.S. winter at the refuge every year. Visitors from all over the country come to view them. Crop Units on the property are pieces of land where crops are grown with food value for the cranes and other species. There is even a rare wild orchid species that grows here for only 15 days after a burn, which means about every two years. Many other native plants are also protected. 


The C. L. Dees trail, named for a local resident who owned a large portion of the land where the refuge was established, is a 3/4 mile long trail that gives visitors the opportunity to explore much native vegetation. Small green markers label the different species of plants along the way. Its greenery changes with the seasons and therefore, so do the foliage markers, allowing the rangers to keep visitors up to date on what is growing, and where, at all times. 


I had the pleasure of a guided tour through parts of the refuge. I was surprised to learn that the diversity in the plant life in the area is second only to the tropical rainforest. I was able to view some unique foliage that I had not been privy to before. There are a few species of carnivorous plants here in south Mississippi. One being the pitcher plant, a tall cylindrical stem that opens its top like a water pitcher. Bugs fly or crawl into the plant following the scent of sweet nectar. The tiny downward hairs allow its entry, and keep it from escaping. Digestive enzymes then go to work turning the lifeforms into food. 


Another such plant is the Sundew. This small groundling plant is no bigger than my thumb and colored a pretty, bright red. It blends in well with the earth and I would have missed it completely had it not been brought to my attention. The Sundew glistens in the sun with a dewy appearance that is actually a sticky substance that attracts and traps tiny organisms to itself, curling up to enclose its prey. 

The trail winds through both open savanna land and areas of tall Longleaf pines. The Longleaf is the original dominant species to the area before the timber industry harvested many of them. It has adapted itself to fire, and the needles coil around the apex of the stem of the plant to protect it from the heat. The needles will singe, but the tree survives. The Slash pine, also native, became dominant after the timber industry reforested the land. Slash pines grow much faster than their Longleaf relatives. You will be able to see both species throughout the refuge.


The MS Sandhill Crane NWR is open to visitors during daylight hours only and is closed on federal holidays and Christmas Eve. Dogs are allowed on the C.L. Dees Trail as long as they are on a leash. Stop by the new Visitors Center for interactive exhibits and pick up helpful information, maps and brochures for your trail hikes. Although most of the refuge is closed to visitors year round for conservation purposes, there are plenty of places to visit, including a driving tour that utilizes public streets and surrounding neighborhoods that may offer a glimpse of these endangered creatures. There are also several hundred blinds on the property for viewing the cranes. Free guided tours are offered every Wednesday and Sunday mornings at 8 am during the fall and winter. March is the nesting season and all tours will be on hold through the summer.


December 8, 2018 is this year’s annual Crane Festival from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm. There will be educational booths and demonstrations throughout the day, including: The Environmental Center’s Raptor Demonstration with birds of prey such as hawks, eagles, and owls; the Audubon Zoo’s Bugmobile with insects from around the world and Hattiesburg Zoo’s reptile display with several species of lizards, turtles, and even an alligator. The center will also host the ever popular dance and song demonstration from the Mississippi Choctaws. And thanks to the acclimation pen and timing of the new captive flock of young cranes, there will be an opportunity to view the Mississippi sandhill crane from right near the visitors center. This event is sure to bring something special for the whole family. 


The desire of those involved with the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge is to educate the public on these endangered birds and their habitat that can only be found right here on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.


For more information please visit: www.fws.gov/refuge/Mississippi_Sandhill_Crane

Or call: 228-497-6322 

 

 



 



2018 Cruisin’ The Coast Schedule AUG 28, 2018

2018 Cruisin’ The Coast Schedule


Sunday, September 30

View the Cruise, Downtown Gulfport, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Cruise In, Hardy Court Shopping Center, Gulfport, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Feature Car appearances: Hardy Court, 9 a.m.-noon; View the Cruise, 2-5 p.m.

Cruisin’ Through the Decades, Gautier, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Cristy Lee appearance: View the Cruise, Downtown Gulfport, 2-5 p.m.


Monday, October 1 - Registration open from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at Cruise Central,Gulfport

Feature Car appearances: Cruise Central, 10 a.m.-2p.m.; Long Beach Harbor, 5-7 p.m.

Cristy Lee appearances: Cruise Central, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Long Beach as Grand Marshal, 6-8 p.m.

Autocross – presented by Scarlet Pearl Casino and Autocross Guys, Coast Coliseum (west parking lot), 1-5 p.m. Open to registered vehicles only.

Long Beach Parade – Open to registered vehicles only. First 600 to arrive will be in the parade. Line up at 1 p.m. at Long Beach High School, parade starts at 5:30 p.m. Cristy Lee is Grand Marshal.

The Tip Tops playing at Long Beach Harbor, 6-9 p.m.

Tuesday, October 2 - Registration open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Cruise Central, Gulfport

The Vicari Auto Auction vehicle check-in at Coliseum 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Autocross – presented by Scarlet Pearl Casino and Autocross Guys, Coast Coliseum (west parking lot), 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Open to registered vehicles only.

"Salute To Our Veterans,” 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Cruise Central

Cruisin’ The River City, Moss Point, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Feature Car appearances: Salute to Our Veterans, Cruise Central, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Cristy Lee appearances: Autocross, 10 a.m.-noon; Salute To Our Veterans, Cruise Central, 1-3 p.m.

Flame-throwing competition at Island View Casino in Gulfport, Entertainment, 4 p.m., Registration, 5 p.m., begins at dusk; $600 Cash Prizes & Trophies!

Wednesday, October 3 - Registration open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Cruise Central, Gulfport

Biloxi Block Party, Downtown Biloxi, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

Autocross – presented by Scarlet Pearl Casino and Autocross Guys, Coast Coliseum, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Open to registered vehicles only.

The Vicari Auto Auction vehicle check-in at Coliseum, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Car Corral open and vehicle check-in, east of Treasure Bay, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Feature Car appearance: Biloxi Block Party, 10 a.m.-noon

Diamondhead, Blessing of the Classics, 3-6 p.m.

Cristy Lee appearances: Biloxi Block Party, Town Green, 10 a.m.-noon; Beau Rivage Meet & Greet, 6-8 p.m.

Courtney Hansen appearances: Biloxi Block Party, Town Green, 10 a.m.-noon; Beau Rivage Meet & Greet, 6-8 p.m.

Official Beau Rivage Cruisin’ Event: The Dominos, Beau Rivage Pool Pavilion, 7 p.m.

Thursday, October 4 - Registration and all Cruisin’ Venues are open 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

2019 Registration open noon-5 p.m.

Country Cruisin’ Breakfast, Long Beach Yacht Club, 7-10 a.m.

The Vicari Auto Auction, doors open at 8:30 a.m.

Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet open at Coliseum, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Car Corral open and vehicle check-in, east of Treasure Bay, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Feature Car appearances: Pass Christian,10 a.m.-noon; Bay St. Louis, 2-4 p.m., DoubleTree Hotel Biloxi, 6-9 p.m.

Joe & Amanda Martin, Martin Brothers Customs/Iron Resurrection appearances: Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet, Coliseum, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.; DoubleTree Biloxi Cruise-in, 7-9 p.m.

Courtney Hansen appearances: Pass Christian, 10 a.m.-noon; Bay St. Louis, 2-4 p.m.; DoubleTree Biloxi Cruise-in, 7-9 p.m.

Burn ‘em Up in the Pass! 2nd Street, Pass Christian, 5-8 p.m.

Live entertainment TBD. Check our website and Facebook for more information.

DoubleTree Hotel Biloxi Open House with Feature Car, Joe & Amanda Martin and Courtney Hansen, 6-9 p.m.



Cruisin’ Venue Entertainment


Bay St. Louis

11 a.m.-Noon – Garry Wesley

1-2 p.m. – Magic

3-4:30 p.m. – Vince Vance & The Valiants

Pass Christian

11 a.m.-Noon – Figure Eight

1-2 p.m. – Modern Eldorados

3-4:30 p.m. – The Big Easy Boys

Gulfport Cruise Central

11 a.m.-Noon – Brandie

1-2 p.m. – Barlow Brothers

3-4:30 p.m. – Na Na Sha

Edgewater Mall West Parking Lot (Hwy 90)

11 a.m.-Noon – N Rhythm

1-2 p.m. – Soul Lads

3-4:30 p.m. – The Chee-Weez

D’Iberville

11 a.m.-Noon – Mr. Saxman

1-2 p.m. – The Shakerz

3-4:30 p.m. – Departure (Journey Tribute)

Ocean Springs Downtown

11 a.m.-Noon – Charles "Doo Wop” Grant

1-2 p.m. – Cool Rayz

3-4:30 p.m. – Tip Tops

Pascagoula

11 a.m.-Noon – Deuce Coupe

1-2 p.m. – Starz

3-4:30 p.m. – Dr. Zarr


Friday, October 5 - All Cruisin’ Venues are open 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

2018 and 2019 Registration continues 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Country Cruisin’ Breakfast, Long Beach Yacht Club, 7-10 a.m.

The Vicari Auto Auction doors open at 8:30 a.m.

Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet open at Coliseum, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Car Corral continues, east of Treasure Bay, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Feature Car appearances: Bay St. Louis, 9-11 a.m.; Edgewater Mall, 2-4 p.m.

Joe & Amanda Martin, Martin Brothers Customs/Iron Resurrection appearances: Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet, Coliseum, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Courtney Hansen appearances: Pascagoula, 10 a.m.-noon; Ocean Springs, 2-5 p.m.

Ocean Springs Sock Hop & Street Party, 5-9 p.m. featuring The Big Easy Boys 6-7 p.m. and The Molly Ringwalds 7:30-9 p.m.

"Pass In The Night,” 5-9 p.m., Pass Christian,


Cruisin’ Venue Entertainment


Bay St. Louis

11 a.m.-Noon – Deuce Coupe

1-2 p.m. – Barlow Brothers

3-4:30 p.m. – Departure (Journey Tribute

Pass Christian

11 a.m.-Noon – Charles "Doo Wop” Grant

1-2 p.m. – Cool Rayz

3-4:30 p.m. – The Chee-Weez

Gulfport Cruise Central

11 a.m.-Noon – Figure Eight

1-2 p.m. – Soul Lads

3-4:30 p.m. – Vince Vance & The Valiants

Edgewater Mall West Parking Lot (Hwy 90)

11 a.m.-Noon – Garry Wesley

1-2 p.m. – The Skakerz

3-4:30 p.m. – The Tip Tops

D’Iberville

11 a.m.-Noon – Brandie

1-2 p.m. – Starz

3-4:30 p.m. – Dr. Zarr

Ocean Springs Downtown

11 a.m.-Noon – N Rhythm

1-2 p.m. – Modern Eldorados

3-4:30 p.m. – The Big Easy Boys

Pascagoula

11 a.m.-Noon – Mr. Saxman

1-2 p.m. – Magic

3-4:30 p.m. – Na Na Sha


Saturday, October 6  - All Cruisin’ Venues are open 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

2018 registration, 9 a.m.-noon - 2019 Registration, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Country Cruisin’ Breakfast, Long Beach Yacht Club, 7-10 a.m.

The Vicari Auto Auction, doors open at 8:30 a.m.

Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet open at Coliseum 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Car Corral continues, east of Treasure Bay, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Feature Car appearance: Vicari Auction’s CTC Swap Meet, Coliseum, 9-11 a.m.

"Field of Wheels” exotic car show at MGM Park across from Beau Rivage, hosted by Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free for spectators. Special guest judges. 


Cruisin’ Venue Entertainment

Bay St. Louis

11 a.m.-Noon – N Rhythm

1-2 p.m. – Pat Murphy & Sippiana Soul

3-4:30 p.m. – The Big Easy Boys

Pass Christian

11 a.m.-Noon – Mr. Saxman

1-2 p.m. – The Shakerz

3-4:30 p.m. – Departure (Journey Tribute)

Gulfport Cruise Central

11 a.m.-Noon – Charles "Doo Wop” Grant

1-2 p.m. – Cool Rayz

3-4:30 p.m. – The Chee-Weez

Edgewater Mall West Parking Lot (Hwy 90)

11 a.m.-Noon – Deuce Coupe

1-2 p.m. – Magic

3-4:30 p.m. – Dr. Zarr

D’Iberville

11 a.m.-Noon – Figure Eight

1-2 p.m. – Barlow Brothers

3-4:30 p.m. – Vince Vance & The Valiants

Ocean Springs Downtown

11 a.m.-Noon – Brandie

1-2 p.m. – Starz

3-4:30 p.m. – Na Na Sha

Pascagoula

11 a.m.-Noon – Garry Wesley

1-2 p.m. – Modern Eldorados

3-4:30 p.m. – The Tip Tops


Sunday, October 7

All events at Cruise Central

2019 Registration open 8 a.m.-Noon.

Non-denominational prayer service, 8 a.m.

Stamping Cards must be turned in by 9 a.m.

Gene Oswalt Volunteer of the Year Award

The winners of the Cash Drawings will be announced (40 drawings of $500 each) totaling $20,000

Make-A-Wish Raffle Car Giveaway and unveiling of new 2019 Raffle Car!

Live entertainment by The Big Easy Boys, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m.


 



CRUISIN’ THROUGH THE DECADES: A Car Show AUG 27, 2018

In 1996, the Mississippi Gulf Coast welcomed its first ever Cruisin’ the Coast, a festival celebrating classic and antique cars, as well as hot-rod vehicles. The event has grown from 374 vehicles entered that first year to more than 8,000 in 2010! 


Kicking off the week this year, Gautier will be hosting its own 2nd Annual Cruisin’ Through the Decades on September 30, 2018, 11am-4pm. Gautier’s Cruisin’ event celebrates not only classic cars, but also more modern, customized vehicles. All makes, models, years, and motorcycles are welcome.

 

 

 


If you would like to enter a vehicle, early registration is now open and will end September 24. Registration is free. 


There are several classes to choose from: 


— Antiques up to 1949 (not a reproduction), that conform to manufacturer specifications and appearance

— Street Rods (may be a reproduction), model year 1948 and older that have been altered or modified, weighing not more than 9000 pounds 

— Best of: 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s to now

— Special interests: Uniquely distinguishable, or designed for a particular purpose

— Motorcycles


There will be People’s Choice Award trophies for crowd favorite, and trophies for every class, including all cars and bikes. Enjoy reserved parking and a designated cruising lane for all cruisers.

 

 

 


This year holds a very special new addition. Robby Amonett, a talented artist of Jackson County, will be onsite with his acrylic paints and canvases. Onlookers will enjoy watching the process, and owners will have the opportunity for their beloved vehicles to be memorialized in a unique fashion, right before their eyes.


Of course it wouldn’t be a Gulf Coast festival without some amazing live music. This year will include Derek Norsworthy, Six String Andrew & Band, The Cat Daddyz, Double Dee, and Wayward Jones.


All enthusiasts welcome! Come celebrate with good food, live entertainment, vendors, and more.


For more information, please visit www.gautier-ms.gov